Tag Archives: Outdoors

And the long wait begins

10 Aug

Well, I’m now going crazy with the wait to find out whether I get a place at University or not………..but there are plenty of things to keep me occupied in the meantime 😀

Since deciding to change my direction completely and study Environmental Science, I thought I should start getting as much real-life experience as possible, as well as continuing with my online short course in vertebrate zoology. I have to acknowledge that it’s a truly competitive world out there, and if I want to be a success, I’m going to have to make sure that when I graduate (fingers crossed 🙂 ) I am armed with even more than a degree. I know this all may seem a little pre-emptive, considering I don’t even have a university place yet, but I figure any experience is good experience and if I don’t get the opportunity to start at the beginning of next year then it may help me get in mid-year or even when 2013 applications open.

So, even though it may not be about my study specifically I thought I’d spend a bit of time posting about the experiences I’ve had so far!

My first point of call was to visit the website of a local wildlife organisation of which I was already a member, to check out if they had any opportunities available. Turned out that they run various courses each month, mostly one day but sometimes two, at exceptionally reasonable prices (I’m talking round A$20!!) covering various themes and topics. I immediately signed up for one of their starter classes entitled “The Rescue & Transport of Injured Wildlife”. I couldn’t believe that such a valuable resource was available and made so easily accessible, why had I not done this before 😀 So I attended the course a couple of weekends ago. Bob actually came with me because he wanted to show his support in my new direction which I love him for, but I have to say, the look on his face when he found out (while taking our seats) that is was a day long course and not couple of hours as he’d assumed was priceless 😉

It was certainly a most informative day, though quite hard at times. In fact, I’ve seen enough images of injured and distressed animals to last me quite some time (and the things that people do to animals!!!!), but I think it was an extremely useful course to have attended, because while my end goal is not to run a wildlife shelter or similar, I will most certainly come across cases very like the ones discussed and I want to be fully prepared. Also, just from a basic wildlife handling perspective, I learned so much in just 8 hours. It’s always great to hear real-world advice from someone who has been in the field for so many years (I believe this particular wildlife instructor had been rescuing for 20 years!)

 It’s funny though, when you attend these things…there’s always one isn’t there? You know who I mean….The person who you want to turn to and ask why they even bothered coming because they apparently already seem to know everything!! 😡 (just in case this is not clear, I am trying for a frown here…in fact it actually looks like frog with a crazy hair-do 🙂 )

Well, we had one. Some individual in the back row, who not only could not keep quiet (consistent interruptions), but who kept trying to contradict the course facilitator with her own pearls of ‘wisdom’. Now I’m all for open discussion and lively debate, but this girl clearly felt that she was the only one in the room (and the only knowledgeable one at that including our instructor) and that she was there for a private one-on-one. In fact, the course ran over by almost an hour, pretty much solely because of this person. I just don’t understand why some people don’t ‘cotton on’ as the old expression goes, especially when the rest of the class is staring at you and clearly getting quite frustrated! The rest of us were there to actually listen and learn from someone who had knowledge based on a wealth of experience and tried & tested methods, not to prove a point!

 Later in the evening, Bob and I were discussing the individual and I came to the realisation that I’m probably going to have to get used to the ‘Hermiones’ of the classroom environment. It’s been so long since I last went to school and then University that I’d forgotten all about them!! But, also, at the same time, it got me thinking about how NOT to become one. As an extremely passionate individual with a little bit of life experience under her belt who wants to become a contributor during classes and tutorials this time around, how do I walk the line between fascinated and knowledgeable student and total know-it-all??

And, as always…any advice on this point would be welcome!

Anyways, that’s my food for thought today 😀

 Fact 3: The Japanese Macaque (Snow Monkey) is native to Japan and eats a large variety of foods, including plants, insects and fruits, so far so normal, however what is fascinating with these creatures is that they wash their food before eating it! Researchers discovered this when they left sweet potatoes on the beach for a group of these monkeys. One female took a potato and washed it off in the water before eating it, and the rest followed suit. The ocean water not only cleans the food, but the salt in it offers seasoning, too!!

For more information about the strange eating habits of animals go to: http://green.yahoo.com/blog/care2/285/10-animals-with-interesting-eating-habits.html

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